Arguments on utilitarianism

In Satisficing Consequentialism, Michael Slote argues for a form of utilitarianism where "an act might qualify as morally right through having good enough consequences, even though better consequences could have been produced.

The Life of John Stuart Mill. Even if one holds that beneficence is not a requirement of morality but something supererogatory and morally good, one is still regarding beneficence as an important part of morality -- as desirable if not required.

How one classifies agapism depends on how one interprets it and, unfortunately, its theological exponents have been neither clear nor of one mind about this.

There are less precise ways of defining utilitarianism, which I shall use for convenience, but in my use of the term, I shall mean the view that the sole ultimate standard of right, wrong, and obligation is the principle of utility, which says quite strictly that the moral end to be sought in all we do is the greatest possible balance of good over evil or the least possible balance of evil over good in the whole world.

This article gives a good historical account of important figures in the development of utilitarianism. There is also retributive justice punishment, etc. In fact the principle of utility represents a compromise with the ideal. Also, rarely, two separately fertilized eggs can, instead of resulting in fraternal twins, fuse together and develop into a single human individual a tetragametic chimera.

Very valuable work on nineteenth century British political discourse; includes discussion of the Philosophic Radicals. He says that evolutionary psychology suggests that humans naturally tend to be self-interested. Being committed to impartialist justifications of moral rules does not commit them to rejecting moral rules that allow or require people to give specific others priority.

It all depends on the amount of pleasure one actually gains from the activity. A further criticism of the Utilitarian formula "Maximize pleasure" is that it assumes a continuous pleasure-pain scale that lets us treat degrees of pain as negative degrees of pleasure.

Being committed to impartialist justifications of moral rules does not commit them to rejecting moral rules that allow or require people to give specific others priority. In this sense, there are many absolute rules -- our two principles and all their corollaries.

Then, the ethics of love is not purely agapistic and is identical with the view I have been proposing. By adding "to or for anyone" at the end of each of them one makes the principle of beneficence universalistic, by adding "to or for others" one makes it altruistic.

Hare and John Harsanyi, As the title suggests, however, most of the articles are critical of utilitarianism. The resulting theory would be a deontological one, but it would be much closer to utilitarianism than most deontological theories; we might call it a mixed deontological theory.

Peter Singer

More particularly, does the principle of justice require us to help people in proportion to their needs or to call on them in proportion to their abilities?

An interesting development of a form of rule utilitarianism by an influential moral theorist. In general, whatever is being evaluated, we ought to choose the one that will produce the best overall results.

Consequentialism

In order to have a criminal justice system that protects people from being harmed by others, we authorize judges and other officials to impose serious punishments on people who are convicted of crimes.Utilitarianism is one of the most powerful and persuasive approaches to normative ethics in the history of philosophy.

Though not fully articulated until the 19 th century, proto-utilitarian positions can be discerned throughout the history of ethical theory.

Though there are many varieties of the view discussed, utilitarianism is generally held to be. Utilitarianism [John Stuart Mill, George Sher] on teachereducationexchange.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

This expanded edition of John Stuart Mill's Utilitarianism includes the text of his speech to the British House of Commons defending the use of capital punishment in cases of aggravated murder. The speech is significant both because its topic remains timely and because its arguments. Utilitarianism is one of the most powerful and persuasive approaches to normative ethics in the history of philosophy.

Though not fully articulated until the 19 th century, proto-utilitarian positions can be discerned throughout the history of ethical theory. Though there are many varieties of the view discussed, utilitarianism is generally held to be the view that the morally right action is.

An Introduction to the Principles of Morals and Legislation. Jeremy Bentham Contents Preface I: Of The Principle of Utility II: Of Principles Adverse to that of Utility.

teachereducationexchange.com: Utilitarianism: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions) (): Katarzyna de Lazari-Radek, Peter Singer: Books. Peter Albert David Singer, AC (born 6 July ) is an Australian moral philosopher.

He is the Ira W. DeCamp Professor of Bioethics at Princeton University, and a Laureate Professor at the Centre for Applied Philosophy and Public Ethics at the University of teachereducationexchange.com specialises in applied ethics and approaches ethical issues from a .

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Arguments on utilitarianism
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